A Plan S for books: Voices from the Community

UPDATE AUGUST 2021: a blog post reflecting upon the outcomes of the Voices from the OA Books Community series is available to view here, and you can download the document that summarises the discussions here. This summary was shared with cOAlition S.

What should a Plan S for books look like? This is a question we’ve been thinking about at the Open Access Books Network (OABN) — and we want to hear from as many members of the OA books community as possible as we seek to answer it.

Image graphic for 'Voices from the OA Books Community' event that says 'What could a Plan S for books look like?'
Agata Morka, CC BY.

Continue reading “A Plan S for books: Voices from the Community”

mediastudies.press: A conversation with founder Jeff Pooley

This post, written by Jeff Pooley (professor of media & communication at Muhlenberg College and director of mediastudies.press), is an introduction to the next event in the ‘BoOkmArks: Open Conversations About OA Books’ series. A live session, open to all, will be held via this Zoom link on Tuesday 26th January at 16:00 CET/ 15:00 GMT/10:00 ET, when we will interview Jeff about the founding and first year of mediastudies.press. If you have questions for Jeff, please add them to the comments section below so they can be included in the conversation on 26th January — and join us at the event if you can! A recording will be available afterwards via our YouTube channel.

by Jeff Pooley

I’m looking forward to joining the BoOkmArks conversation next week. In advance of the discussion, I thought I would introduce the main project that I’ll be talking about, mediastudies.press. Continue reading “mediastudies.press: A conversation with founder Jeff Pooley”

Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) – Tagging help by OABN

Background

The Open Access Tracking Project (OATP), is a crowd-sourced social tagging project that runs on open-source software. It harnesses the power of the community to capture news and comment on open access (OA) in every academic field and region of the world. We want to help expand its coverage of OA books — and you can help! Continue reading “Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) – Tagging help by OABN”

2020 with OABN

We have come a long way from what started as a post-conference conversation in a bar in Marseille back in the summer of 2019, where the idea of creating a network for the OA books community was first discussed. The Open Access Books Network was formally launched in September and, as this strange year comes to a close, we wanted to have a look back at some of the OABN 2020 highlights. 

Great expectations

The Open Access Books Network officially launched in the fall and it did so with fireworks (well, we tried to be as festive as possible under the circumstances). On September 15th we cut a symbolic ribbon live on screen, welcoming our virtual guests in the OA books community. It was great to see so many familiar and new faces at the event!  Continue reading “2020 with OABN”

Financing change: KU Leuven’s Fair OA Fund

The author of this post, Demmy Verbeke (Head of KU Leuven Libraries Artes), also spoke with us about the KU Leuven Fair OA Fund at a ‘BoOkmArks: Open Conversations About OA Books’ event. A recording of our conversation is available here.

by Demmy Verbeke

If you want change, try something new.

This seems comically simple advice, but it is advice that universities, worldwide, seem unable or unwilling to follow when it comes to building and maintaining the infrastructure for scholarly communication. The first reason to want change is the cost of this infrastructure, which has been considered problematic since the beginning of the twentieth century, and which has only risen since, high above the rate of inflation.

Secondly, concerns have been raised over and over again about how research output (and particularly how an individual scholar or an institution making use of scholarly communication infrastructure) has become intertwined with research assessment, and that the methods used for this assessment do not align with scholarly values. One example: assessing an individual scholar by the press where he or she publishes, which, in essence, equals outsourcing judgment to an external party who is not focused on assessing the quality of the work but its commercial potential. Continue reading “Financing change: KU Leuven’s Fair OA Fund”

Reassembling Scholarly Communications. Histories, Infrastructures, and Global Politics of Open Access. BoOkmArks session with Martin Paul Eve on November 23rd.

This post, written by Prof. Martin Paul Eve, is an introduction to the next episode of the ‘BoOkmArks: Open Conversations About OA Books’ series. A live session will be held via this Zoom link on November 23rd at 16:00 CET / 15:00 GMT/10AM ET, when we will interview Martin, the co-editor of a newly published book on open access: Reassembling Scholarly Communications. Histories, Infrastructures, and Global Politics of Open Access. If you have questions for Martin, please add them to the comments section below so they can be included in the conversation on November 23rd — and join us at the event if you can! 

by Martin Paul Eve

It can be easy to forget, in the maelstrom of policy compliance, that open access is, at its heart, about the fundamental good of scholarly communications. Too often, we lose sight of why we are doing open access as we are bogged down in the how. Indeed, the ‘how’s of funder mandates, article processing charges, embargo periods, and other procedural elements have frequently led to a situation where the first encounter that researchers have with open access is negative, a mere demand for conformity, rather than a celebration of the possibilities of free-to-read and free-to-reuse, peer-reviewed knowledge. Continue reading “Reassembling Scholarly Communications. Histories, Infrastructures, and Global Politics of Open Access. BoOkmArks session with Martin Paul Eve on November 23rd.”

OPERAS: the European Infrastructure for Research in SSH. BoOkmArks session with Pierre Mounier on November 10th

This post is an introduction to the next episode of the BoOkmArks: Open Conversations About OA Books series. A live session will be held via this Zoom link on November 10th at 16:00 CEST / 15:00 BST, when we will interview Pierre Mounier, OPERAS Coordinator, OpenEdition Associate Director  and the DOAB Co-Director, about the OPERAS project. If you have questions for Pierre, please add them to the comments section below so they can be included in the conversation on November 10th — and join us at the event if you can! 

OPERAS (Open Scholarly Communication in the European Research Area for Social Sciences and Humanities) is a project funded by the EU’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, aiming at advancing open scholarly communication in the SSH area. A project of considerable scale, OPERAS is governed by three Assemblies, has over 40 members, with the core members responsible for developing the project’s strategy representing different countries across Europe: France, UK, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Greece, Croatia, Slovenia and Portugal. Continue reading “OPERAS: the European Infrastructure for Research in SSH. BoOkmArks session with Pierre Mounier on November 10th”

OA Week 2020 Interview: the Dutch Research Council (NWO) Funding for Open Access Books 

Amidst a year filled with turmoil and change, the International Open Access Week makes its annual return (19-26 October). Its theme is ‘Open with Purpose: Taking Action to Build Structural Equity & Inclusion’. As part of Open Access week the Open Access Books Network (OABN) would like to zoom in on a few developments in the open access books world through a series of interviews. As part of this second interview Agata Morka (OABN) spoke with  Hans de Jonge (NWO) to learn more about a dedicated funding scheme for open access books.

Continue reading “OA Week 2020 Interview: the Dutch Research Council (NWO) Funding for Open Access Books “